18.4 C
Ontario
Monday, July 8, 2024

I’ve really found my way, and who I am as a Test cricketer. I’m loving it: Mitchell Marsh

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -


I’ve really found my way, and who I am as a Test cricketer. I’m loving it: Mitchell Marsh

New Delhi, Dec 25 (Ajit Weekly News) Australia cricketer Mitchell Marsh has shared his love for the longest format of the game, and how he found his lost touch with the bat as the hosts gear up for the Boxing Day Test against Pakistan in Melbourne starting from December 26.

The 2023 year marked a pivotal chapter in Marsh’s career as he donned the whites for the Australian Test side once again. What stood out was not just his return but the rapid transformation in his batting approach. The numbers spoke volumes – a striking strike rate of 73.40, a significant leap from his earlier 50.68 over 32 Tests.

The series opener at Perth Stadium became the stage for Marsh’s triumphant return, a homecoming that exceeded all expectations. His belligerent 90 and an unbeaten 63 were nothing short of spectacular, earning him the coveted player of the match honors and even outshining the century-maker David Warner. It was a run-a-ball performance that left spectators in awe and opponents in despair.

“The way I went about (batting in Perth) was the way I want to play my cricket,” Marsh said to Fox Cricket. “In my last four Test matches I’ve really found my way, and who I am as a Test cricketer. I’m loving it,” he added.

Marsh, once burdened with the pressure to conform to a traditional Test cricketer’s mold, had shed that weight. In the early stages of his Test career, he tried to emulate the likes of Steve Smith and Usman Khawaja, but the result was hesitancy, defensiveness, and a reluctance to attack deliveries in his hitting zone.

“I tried to play the long innings and play like Steve Smith and Davey and Uzzie and all those guys that come bat for six hours,” Marsh explained. I don’t necessarily have the technique of Smudge and Marnus (Labuschagne), where they can defend and leave and defend and leave for hours and get through those periods.”

The turning point came with his unforgettable Ashes century at Headingley. Since then, Marsh has played with a newfound freedom and confidence, unearthing his own DNA for Test batting. His counterattacking approach mirrored the success of Travis Head, who had been making waves in the Test arena since the 2021/22 Ashes series, boasting a strike rate of 79.20 during that period.

“I know that when I show really good intent that I move better and I can defend good balls, but ultimately I can put pressure back onto other teams,” Marsh said. I just wanted to come back into this Test team and be really true to myself.”

A key factor in Marsh’s resurgence can be traced back to the ‘own your space’ mantra that defines the Cummins-McDonald era. Players are encouraged to prepare for Test cricket in a way that suits them best, taking ownership of their journey, successes, and failures. Marsh and Head, both victims of multiple drops during Justin Langer’s coaching tenure, have thrived under this philosophy.

“I’ve said that numerous times now, but I’m thankful for Pat and Ronnie for helping me get to this point,” Marsh continued. “I’ve found a method that works … hopefully I can stay nice and consistent with the way I’m playing and keep contributing.”

The No. 6 spot is Marsh’s for the foreseeable future. Perhaps for the first time in his career, he enters the Boxing Day Test without the lingering fear of being dropped.

“I don’t necessarily feel like I’ll ever own a spot in the team, but I feel blessed to have been given another opportunity and I’m just thoroughly enjoying it,” Marsh said.

I’ve got a really clear role that allows me to just be myself and hopefully I can hang around for a little bit longer.”

–Ajit Weekly News

hs/


News Credits – I A N S

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -spot_img
- Advertisement -spot_img
- Advertisement -spot_img
- Advertisement -spot_img
- Advertisement -
Latest news
Related news